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24, bristol
"Obesity (fatness) – as an identity or an experience - does not exist in a vacuum. One’s experience as a fat person is mediated by their gender, race, class standing, ability, and citizenship status; these realities overlap, intersect and complicate the way that a disease classification may be stacked onto other marginalized identities. Furthermore, because women, poor people and people of color are likelier to be classified/seen as fat in our culture, the AMA decision de facto upholds sexism, classism and racism."
— 1 year ago with 388 notes
"When you grow up poor, sometimes books are the only connection you have to the world that exists outside your neighborhood. You begin to imagine that the people in those books matter. You imagine that they are important—maybe even immortal—because someone wrote about them. But you? When you fail to find yourself in books—or people like you, who live in neighborhoods like yours, who look like you and love like you—you begin to question your place in the world. You begin to question if those people who make up your neighborhood and your family are worth writing about, if you are worth writing about. Maybe no one thinks about them or you. Maybe no one sees you."
— 1 year ago with 3773 notes
fingersandfelines:

the biggest Colocasia leaf i’ve ever seen

fingersandfelines:

the biggest Colocasia leaf i’ve ever seen

(via ficusfern-deactivated20140512)

— 1 year ago with 53 notes

nardvvuar:

the way I see it, “black pride” (or any sort of “minority” pride movement) means “I am proud of who I am DESPITE those who have told me and my people that whiteness is superior” while “white pride” means “I am proud of who I am BECAUSE whiteness is superior” and that’s why it’s ok to say one but not the other

(Source: emojigrl, via dogmagick)

— 1 year ago with 62012 notes

MOROCCO. Near Tabant (Ait Bouguemmez). Berber women cutting grass for their cattle fodder. 1988.
© Bruno Barbey/Magnum Photos

MOROCCO. Near Tabant (Ait Bouguemmez). Berber women cutting grass for their cattle fodder. 1988.

© Bruno Barbey/Magnum Photos

(Source: mediterraneenne, via romanvs)

— 1 year ago with 83 notes
womenwhokickass:

Norah Nelson Napaljarri: Why she kicks ass
She is a Warlpiri-speaking Indigenous artist from Australia’s Western Desert region, who began painting in 1986, and has exhibited her works both in Australia and other countries. Her paintings and pottery are held in the collection of the National Gallery of Victoria.
Norah first painted in 1986, assisting her husband, but was creating works in her own right by 1987. As of 2004 she was living in Yuendumu and painted for the Indigenous art centre there, Warlukurlangu Artists.
Western Desert artists frequently paint particular ‘dreamings’, or stories, for which they have personal responsibility or rights. In Norah’s case these have included Karntjarra (Two Women), Ngaru (bush plum) Ngarlkirdi (witchetty grub) and Pangkurlangu (Giant) dreamings. 
She has also painted a series of works based on the Yiwarra (Milky Way) dreaming, with the permission of that dreaming’s senior custodian at Yuendumu, Paddy Sims. One of this series was chosen as the design for a mosaic at the new court complex for the Supreme Court of the Northern Territory, and reviewed for Art Monthly by Patrick Hutchings.
She first exhibited in September 1987 at the Karnta (Women) exhibition at the Esplanade Gallery in Darwin, and has since shown her work widely, in exhibitions of Warlukurlangu Artists in Melbourne, Perth, Adelaide and Alice Springs. She has also shown at Galeria Alfredo Melgar in Madrid and, independently of Warlukurlangu Artists, at the Dreamtime Gallery in Perth, where her first two person show with Bronson Nelson in February 1990 was a featured event at the Perth Festival. 
Galleries in both Australia and elsewhere have exhibited works by Norah, including Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi in Melbourne, the Lowe Art Museum at the University of Miami in the United States, and the National Gallery of Victoria. Her works are held in several major Australian collections, including the private Holmes à Court collection, and the public collection of the National Gallery of Victoria.

womenwhokickass:

Norah Nelson Napaljarri: Why she kicks ass

  • She is a Warlpiri-speaking Indigenous artist from Australia’s Western Desert region, who began painting in 1986, and has exhibited her works both in Australia and other countries. Her paintings and pottery are held in the collection of the National Gallery of Victoria.
  • Norah first painted in 1986, assisting her husband, but was creating works in her own right by 1987. As of 2004 she was living in Yuendumu and painted for the Indigenous art centre there, Warlukurlangu Artists.
  • Western Desert artists frequently paint particular ‘dreamings’, or stories, for which they have personal responsibility or rights. In Norah’s case these have included Karntjarra (Two Women), Ngaru (bush plum) Ngarlkirdi (witchetty grub) and Pangkurlangu (Giant) dreamings. 
  • She has also painted a series of works based on the Yiwarra (Milky Way) dreaming, with the permission of that dreaming’s senior custodian at Yuendumu, Paddy Sims. One of this series was chosen as the design for a mosaic at the new court complex for the Supreme Court of the Northern Territory, and reviewed for Art Monthly by Patrick Hutchings.
  • She first exhibited in September 1987 at the Karnta (Women) exhibition at the Esplanade Gallery in Darwin, and has since shown her work widely, in exhibitions of Warlukurlangu Artists in Melbourne, Perth, Adelaide and Alice Springs. She has also shown at Galeria Alfredo Melgar in Madrid and, independently of Warlukurlangu Artists, at the Dreamtime Gallery in Perth, where her first two person show with Bronson Nelson in February 1990 was a featured event at the Perth Festival. 
  • Galleries in both Australia and elsewhere have exhibited works by Norah, including Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi in Melbourne, the Lowe Art Museum at the University of Miami in the United States, and the National Gallery of Victoria. Her works are held in several major Australian collections, including the private Holmes à Court collection, and the public collection of the National Gallery of Victoria.

(via oldsoilwitch-deactivated2014051)

— 1 year ago with 617 notes
sexyposipunks:

I feel ugly and lonely…

sexyposipunks:

I feel ugly and lonely…

— 1 year ago with 15 notes